William blake lamb tyger essay

What is certain is that “The Tyger,” being one of his Songs of Experience , represents one of two “contrary states of the human soul” -- “experience” perhaps in the sense of disillusionment being contrary to “innocence” or the naivete of a child. In the penultimate stanza, Blake brings the tyger round to face his counterpart in Songs of Innocence , “ The Lamb ,” asking “Did he smile his work to see? / Did he who made the Lamb make thee?” The tyger is fierce, frightening and wild, yet part of the same creation as the lamb, docile and endearing. In the final stanza, Blake repeats the original burning question, creating a more powerful awe by substituting the word “dare” for “could”:

Tyger! Tyger! burning bright
In the forests of the night,
What immortal hand or eye
Could frame thy fearful symmetry?

In what distant deeps or skies
Burnt the fire of thine eyes?
On what wings dare he aspire?
What the hand, dare sieze the fire?

And what shoulder, & what art,
Could twist the sinews of thy heart?
And when thy heart began to beat,
What dread hand? & what dread feet?

What the hammer? what the chain?
In what furnace was thy brain?
What the anvil? what dread grasp
Dare its deadly terrors clasp?

When the stars threw down their spears,
And water'd heaven with their tears,
Did he smile his work to see?
Did he who made the Lamb make thee?

Tyger! Tyger! burning bright
In the forests of the night,
What immortal hand or eye
Dare frame thy fearful symmetry?

This is a reversal of the usual method of etching, where the lines of the design are exposed to the acid, and the plate printed by the intaglio method. Relief etching (which Blake referred to as " stereotype " in The Ghost of Abel ) was intended as a means for producing his illuminated books more quickly than via intaglio. Stereotype, a process invented in 1725, consisted of making a metal cast from a wood engraving, but Blake's innovation was, as described above, very different. The pages printed from these plates were hand-coloured in water colours and stitched together to form a volume. Blake used illuminated printing for most of his well-known works, including Songs of Innocence and of Experience , The Book of Thel , The Marriage of Heaven and Hell and Jerusalem . [37]

William blake lamb tyger essay

william blake lamb tyger essay

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