Catcher rye symbolism essay

Reading . Salinger's  The Catcher in the Rye has practically been a rite of passage for teenagers in recent years, but back when it was published in 1951, it wasn't always easy for a kid to get his or her hands on it. According to TIME , "Within two weeks of its 1951 release, . Salinger’s novel rocketed to No. 1 on the New York Times best-seller list. Ever since, the book—which explores three days in the life of a troubled 16-year-old boy—has been a 'favorite of censors since its publication,' according to the American Library Association."

Pencey Prep and Elkton Hills schools also stand for some symbolic meanings. For Holden, these schools represent the phony, cruel world of the administrators. Even the advertisements for Pencey Prep are deceptive. They feature "some hot shot guy on a horse" performing horse-riding feats. Holden mockingly says he has never seen a horse at Pencey. The school's slogan is equally disgusting to Holden: "Since 1888 we have been molding boys into splendid, clear-thinking young men." Holden thinks perhaps there are two boys who fit that description, and they probably might have come to Pencey that way. For Holden, the two schools are representative of a corrupt system planned by adults and catering to boys who want to join their ranks. Holden's dilemma is that he struggles so hard against a system into which he was born.

The Catcher in the Rye Lesson Plans contain 110 pages of teaching material, including: The Catcher in the Rye Lesson Plans Introduction Lesson Calendar Chapter Abstracts Character Descriptions Object Descriptions Daily Lessons Fun Activities Essay Topics Short Essay Questions Short Essay Questions Key Multiple Choice Multiple Choice Key Short Answer Questions Short Answer Questions Key Oral Reading Evaluation Sheet Reading Assignment Sheet Writing Evaluation Form Quiz/Test Generator Download Lesson Plans Follow Us on Facebook About BookRags | Customer Service | Terms of Service | Privacy Policy      Copyright 2017 by BookRags, Inc. FOLLOW BOOKRAGS:

The red hunting hat is one of the most recognizable symbols from twentieth-century American literature. It is inseparable from our image of Holden, with good reason: it is a symbol of his uniqueness and individuality. The hat is outlandish, and it shows that Holden desires to be different from everyone around him. At the same time, he is very self-conscious about the hat—he always mentions when he is wearing it, and he often doesn’t wear it if he is going to be around people he knows. The presence of the hat, therefore, mirrors the central conflict in the book: Holden’s need for isolation versus his need for companionship.

Holden is very lonely, and his adolescent loneliness seems to run much deeper than the feelings so commonly felt at that age. He admits to his loneliness openly, and it gives him evidence that perhaps he might still have some emotions left. At the same time, Holden takes few steps to mitigate his loneliness. Whenever he feels the urge to meet someone, to call up a girl, to have a social experience, he ends up sabotaging it before he can get hurt. He thus protects himself so fully that he effectively shuts off any possibilities of alleviating his own loneliness. He might want to call Jane, for example, but he hangs up before she gets on the phone. He might want to sleep with a prostitute to feel human comfort, but this will not do. He might want to interact with friends at a bar, but he ends up saying something hurtful so that they abandon him. Pushing them away provides a deeper and deeper loneliness, but at these moments of choice he is willing to endure it rather than eventually face the ultimate, devastating loneliness of losing another person like Allie.

Catcher rye symbolism essay

catcher rye symbolism essay

The red hunting hat is one of the most recognizable symbols from twentieth-century American literature. It is inseparable from our image of Holden, with good reason: it is a symbol of his uniqueness and individuality. The hat is outlandish, and it shows that Holden desires to be different from everyone around him. At the same time, he is very self-conscious about the hat—he always mentions when he is wearing it, and he often doesn’t wear it if he is going to be around people he knows. The presence of the hat, therefore, mirrors the central conflict in the book: Holden’s need for isolation versus his need for companionship.

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